A sample of Chapter 5 from Kyrik and the Lost Queen

Sword & Sorcery

Chapter 5

Kyrik and the lost queen gardner f fox sword and sorcery kurt brugel

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Kyrik tried to break free. He kicked back, found that the sole of his war-boot touched something soft and rubbery, but the downward tug was not to be resisted. Steadily he was drawn into the deeps of the cold water, with Adorla on his back.

The girl was hitting him with a fist, as though believing he was playing some game. She did not v know that something had hold of him, or if she did, then she was hitting him in an excess of terror.

The water was colder now, and Kyrik could feel a vague current flowing. There was something above him—a stone roof the top of an embankment?—and then he surged up into the air.

He gasped for that air, drew it into his lungs.

Beside him Adorla was sputtering and splashing. His arm drew her against him and he trod water, staring at a cavern that seemed cut out of rock, that was lighted by a tall pillar of glowing stone. His eyes touched that pillar wonderingly.

He knew of nothing it could be. Stone that glowed, with the cold radiance of the firefly. Yet it lighted up the cavern, it showed the rock walls and the stone ceiling from which encrustations of stone drooped downward, and the pool of stagnant Water.

That water rippled, heaved. Kyrik swam for the shoreline, if such it might be called, a low shelf of stone that rose upward from the water to form a little platform. He reached it, one arm about Adorla, and he dropped her, half-drowned, upon its surface.

He swung about and drew his sword. Whatever had gripped him in that river and drawn him here into its lair was still below the surface. The waters of the pool bubbled and churned, yet nothing appeared. Kyrik drew in deep breaths of the cold, wet air, and stared about him.

There were skeletons here, and bits of rusted armor, a broken sword, and here and there a golden chain that might have belonged to a woman. A chill raced up his back. Did all those who had been flung down that shaft end up here, in past years?

If so—how old was that thing which had clutched him?

“Illis—have you abandoned me?” Soft elfin laughter answered him. “Foolish Kyrik Have you so little faith in me?”

“Faith or no faith, you’ve tricked me somehow.” You will need the firestar! “Firestar? What magic is that?” He was so intent on what Illis might tell him that he came close to forgetting the thing that had dragged him here. But the waters swirled and broke, and a black head, wet and shining, in which two red eyes gloated at him, broke the surface of the pool.

His hand tightened on Bluefang’s hilt. The monster was coming up for him now. It rose slowly, water ran off its thick black hide, and up in front two arm-like appendages fitted with giant claws came stabbing upward through the air.

There was no name for this undersea monster—at least none he had ever heard. It was gigantic. He realized he was looking at only part of this thing that seemed almost to fill the pool. Those red eyes that glared at him were unwinking and steady.

They looked upon him as their prey. At his back, Adorla was sobbing. “What is it? Oh, gods of Alkinoor, what is that thing?”

Kyrik made no answer. He was too intent on watching those clawed arms that reached for him, that moved steadily closer—closer—as the behemoth moved almost lazily through the waters. Kyrik! Step within those claws—and strike! The thing surged upward. If it had legs, those legs braced and lifted it. Swiftly now those clawed arms reached outward—

Kyrik and the lost queen gardner f fox sword and sorcery kurt brugel

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A Sample of Chapter 3 from Kyrik and the Wizard’s Sword

Sword & Sorcery

A Sample of Chapter 3

Kyrik and the wizard's sword gardner f fox sword and sorcery kurt brugel

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They ran before the gusts that grew in intensity as the sky darkened overhead and the waves grew rougher and wilder. The vessel was lifted by those waves and hurled forward, half out of the water at some places, as Olvia clung to the moldboards with both hands and whispered words under her breath that the wind blew away.

Only Kyrik seemed unmoved by the approaching storm. Occasionally his eyes would go to the sail where it strained against the slides and gaskets. His hand was steady on the tiller, always he kept the bow pointed away from the full force of the gale.

Olvia was a little green. When he noticed that she was swallowing hard, he called, “Lie down. Cover yourself with the spare sail you’ll find in the locker. This won’t be pleasant for you, what’s coming.”

She shook her head. “I can stand it.” He merely shrugged. The winds were blowing full force now, and the shallop was bucking and pitching as if it had become demented. Olvia made a mewling sound deep in her throat.

“Heave up, girl,” Kyrik shouted. “But mind you do it away from the wind.”

She gave a brief nod, coughed. Next moment she was hung over the edge of the boat, retching. The seawater came up to drench her wetly, so that from moment to moment she was almost out of sight beneath the waves. But in time she sat back, swallowing hard, though her features still seemed faintly greenish.

“Lie down,” he urged. “Try to rest.” She sank onto the cockpit boards and lay her head against the sack of food. She moaned, drawing up her legs, and turned on her side.

“Still want to find that treasure?” Kyrik sang Out.

She did not answer him. Kyrik lifted his face, feeling the drops of rain slam into him as the black sky opened. The wind was even fiercer, out on the open sea, and the salt spume stung where it lashed his face.

But he grinned, loving every moment of it, even when a cross-wave, wind-driven, threatened to overturn the boat. He righted it by a prodigious feat of strength, pitting his massive muscles against the pull of the waves, keeping the rudder to its proper position, whispering prayers to Illis that the sail would not blow away.

He had estimated the shallop correctly. It was a good sailor. It flew before that gale, skimming lightly through the waves, shaking them to one side or the other in masses of foaming water.

The hours went by and still he sat like a graven image, unmoving as he fought the elements. There was darkness all around him now. It was hard even to make out the sleeping shape of Olvia on the floorboards. But the storm was about to blow itself out, he could sense this in the lessening of the wind, in the ease of wave-tension against the rudder.

It would not come yet, though. These storms on the Sunless Sea were famous from Antherak to Parthenor. They took days, sometimes, before they lost their fury. It made no difference to Kyrik. He did not care whether Ammalauth-Vul were alive or dead. Only Olvia cared about that.

As the darkness faded slowly and the surging of the waves lessened, the girl sat up. Her eyes went to Kyrik, then upward toward the sky.

Kyrik and the wizard's sword gardner f fox sword and sorcery kurt brugel

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A sample from Chapter 2 of Kyrik Fights the Demon World

Sword & Sorcery

A sample from Chapter 2
Kyrik fights the demon world gardner f fox sword and sorcery kurt brugel

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Five days later they rode to the top of a high hill and drew rein; thick mists covered the land below. Here and there a wind tossed about and the fogs parted to show black waters and breeze swayed reeds. Strange vegetation grew beside the reeds, pulpy flowers and thin stalks that waved oddly even when the wind died down.

These were the Doom-day Swamps, vast stretches of water and soft earth where strange beasts were reputed to dwell, and where men had been lost and never seen again unless some wayfarer chanced upon their skeletons.

They could not discover the island of Ikthoros, it was too well hidden by gray mists lying close above the waters. Kyrik rumbled a curse deep in his chest.

“We’ll have to find a boat, our horses can never cross that morass. They’d drown, and we along with them.”

He heeled the black stallion forward. He did not glance at Myrnis, and so did not see her body stiffen or her eyes change slowly to a brilliant emerald. Verdant with godlike life were those eyes, as though carved from the heart of a living jewel. Brilliant were those eyes, shining with iridescent lights for an instant; then their radiance dimmed, and Myrnis looked out of her ordinary green pupils again.

The girl shook herself, opened her lips to call to the warlock-warrior ahead of her, but did not. She rode with a puzzled frown on her pretty face, down to the water’s edge.

The banks of these swamp lands were soft loam, half water. The horses’ hooves sank into mushy grass and they snorted and drew back. The mists were thicker here, blowing about as if filled with avid mouths seeking to devour.

“By Illis of the soft breasts. This is a gloomy place,” muttered Kyrik as he came down out of the kak. “We’ll have to unsaddle and let them run free while we go on.”

“Without a boat?”

“There must be one somewhere near. The men of Kilgol sometimes fish these waters, those which are shallow where no big reptiles come. I’ll go look.”

“No need for that.” Myrnis stood up in the stirrups. Her arm rose; she pointed. “There to the north, beneath a tree.”

Kyrik gave her a curious glance, but he walked in that direction and came upon a shallow dugout fashioned from a log of kinna wood. His muscles bulged as he lifted and pushed it toward the water. Beneath it had been hidden two paddles.

The gypsy girl was at his side, stepping daintily into the dugout so it only swayed a little and soon was still. The warrior eased it out between the reeds, and swung himself into its bow. Myrnis crouched in the prow, dipping a paddle from time to time, her eyes scanning the mists ahead.

“To the left,” she called once, and again: “More to westward.”

Kyrik did not trouble his head about her directions. His keen eyes went between the tiny gaps in the mist even faster than hers. Yet when a certain note crept into her voice he followed her suggestions, and wondered at himself.

All about them were high swamp grasses, rustling against the keel and sides of the dugout. Rearing up out of the gray clouds they could make out a fen-tree, covered with foliage so dark a green it seemed almost black. It was a dismal place, this swamp, and the Tantagolian, who liked open spaces and a cool wind, moved uneasily as though he sensed evil lurking in the mists.

“What manner of man would build a temple in a place like this?” he wondered aloud, and Myrnis laughed softly.

“Once this swamp was lush land where good feeding grasses grew, part of the ancient kingdom of Surrillione, where Moforgon was worshiped. They held strange rites in his temple, they sacrificed beautiful virgins to the demon god. It was not a nice land, Surrillione, in those forgotten days.”

Her eyes were bright as starlight again, but Kyrik did not notice, for her face was turned from him as she watched the waterways ahead. She spoke softly, in a voice more melodious than Myrnis’ own, and it was the voice that stiffened his spine.

“You sound like . . . He shook himself against the notion that had come into his head. He knew that voice, its inflections; he had heard it often enough. In his long ago life, before the spell had been put upon him, he had worshiped the goddess Illis. And short months ago she had come to life for him, to help him defeat Devadonides and slay the demon Absothoth.

His hand reached out, caught the girl, swung her about. Myrnis turned a surprised face to him, eyebrows arched questioningly.

“What is it?” she asked. He was dreaming. It was not Illis who sat in this dugout with him, but a Romany girl. He said, “A notion I had. It’s nothing. I wondered how you knew about Surrillione.”

Myrnis frowned. “It was something I heard, I don’t remember where or when. But it’s true enough.”

She turned back to her paddling, and from time to time the warlock-warrior cast dubious looks at her. He was not satisfied with her answer; no mere gypsy knows the ancient history of this land, he told himself. But what he was beginning to suspect was—nonsense.

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